NFL Most Rushing Yards Odds

Once upon a time in the NFL, rushing was king. Teams would pick running backs as their No. 1 draft choices in hopes of turning their franchises around. Players like Walter Payton, Jim Brown, Barry Sanders, and LaDainian Tomlinson were the difference between playoff runs and watching other teams make a postseason appearance from the comfort of home.

While running backs may not have the same cachet these days, they still play an important role. Organizations like the Tennessee Titans wouldn’t know where they’d be without the likes of Derrick Henry.

Massachusetts does not allow sports betting at the moment. If that changes, though, props and futures bets on things like rushing yards and rushing touchdowns will be available to wager on legally. Here’s a guide to get you ready for if that happens.

NFL Futures – Most Rushing Yards

If Massachusetts legalizes sports betting is legalized, the odds feed below will have up-to-date numbers for betting on rushing stats. You’ll be able to compare NFL rushing leader odds across multiple books, and if you see odds you like, you’ll be able to click on it to go to that book and place a bet.

Where can I bet on NFL most rushing yards?

An app for a legal online sportsbook lets you access that book and place a bet from pretty much anywhere within a state where betting is legal. If Massachusetts allows online sports betting, you would likely have an array of choices, depending on how the actual MA sports betting law shakes out.

At legal sportsbooks, you would then be able to compare current odds for NFL games, as well as lines for NFL player props, futures odds for NFL season win totals, and more. You could also research the NFL sports betting rulebook regarding your bets.

What are NFL rushing prop bets?

In football, there are two major aspects to an offense: passing and running. Both are key, and both get plenty of wagering from new and experienced bettors. You can learn more about NFL passing yards futures here. Meanwhile, for betting on NFL rushing stats, you’ll have chances to bet on individual performances, team performances, and even in-game speculation on how well players are going to respond.

This likely means chances to cheer for specific players to get the ball out of the backfield. It doesn’t matter if you are placing in-play bets on a specific game or long-term futures bets, you’ll be keeping your eyes locked on the number of yards on the ground for a specific player or team, for instance.

You’ll see totals bets that ask you to choose over or under a specific number, combined wagers like rushing yards and receiving yards, score-based bets like total rushing TDs, and even bets on which team or player will end up with the most regular-season rushing yards in the NFL.

Types of NFL rushing props

Here are some of the most popular rushing-related NFL bets you might find at Massachusetts betting sites should they become legal. These prop bets for NFL most rushing yards aren’t the be-all, end-all of available wagers, so check and see what your preferred sportsbook offers, and don’t be afraid to create an account elsewhere if you are in search of more variety or better sign-up bonuses.

  • Most rushing yards: Predict which player will end up with the most rushing yards for the regular season. A variety of candidates will have betting lines, depending on how sportsbooks view their chances. You’ll see a lot of familiar names at the top of the list, such as Saquon Barkley or Derrick Henry. It’s not always the biggest name who ends up with the NFL’s most rushing yards title, either, so make sure you do your homework before betting.
  • Most rushing TDs: This bet is the same as the above, except instead of yards you’re betting on touchdowns. In addition to researching individual running backs, you’ll also want to dig into team offenses to get an idea of where the scoring opportunities are likely to go. Is there a particular back that a team hands the ball to on short-yardage situations? Does the team carry a fullback on the roster to punch holes into the end zone? Some teams use primarily one back on nearly every down, while others go with more of a committee.
  • Total rushing yards: You’ll bet on whether a specific player will rush for more or fewer yards than the line that the sportsbook has set for that player, either for a game or a season.
  • Total rushing touchdowns: Another over/under wager, but this one is for rushing touchdowns. Again, oddsmakers will give you a number for a specific player, and you can bet on whether that player will go over or under that number.
  • Total rushing + receiving yards: This bet has become a bit more popular as the pass-focused offense continues to take over the NFL. Running backs no longer only find yards through the line of scrimmage. Teams also expect them to catch out of the backfield and make plays. The number of dual-threat RBs in the league continues to grow as players like Christian McCaffrey and Alvin Kamara showcase just how valuable they can be for an offense. This bet may also appear as “total number of scrimmage yards” either for a single game or the full season.

NFL rushing yards leaders since 2010

While running the ball is not as in favor as it used to be in the NFL, top running backs will still get their numbers. Below is the leader in rushing yards for each season since 2000:

YearPlayerTeam (at the time)Yards
2021Jonathan TaylorIndianapolis Colts1,811
2020Derrick HenryTennessee Titans2,027
2019Derrick HenryTennessee Titans1,540
2018Ezekiel ElliottDallas Cowboys1,434
2017Kareen HuntKansas City Chiefs1,327
2016Ezekiel ElliottDallas Cowboys1,631
2015Adrian PetersonMinnesota Vikings1,485
2014DeMarco MurrayDallas Cowboys1,845
2013LeSean McCoyPhiladelphia Eagles1,607
2012Adrian PetersonMinnesota Vikings2,097
2011Maurice Jones-DrewJacksonville Jaguars1,606
2010Arian FosterHouston Texans1,616
2009Chris JohnsonTennessee Titans2,006
2008Adrian PetersonMinnesota Vikings1,760
2007LaDainian TomlinsonSan Diego Chargers1,474
2006LaDainian TomlinsonSan Diego Chargers1,815
2005Shaun AlexanderSeattle Seahawks1,880
2004Curtis MartinNew York Jets1,697
2003Jamal LewisBaltimore Ravens2,066
2002Ricky WilliamsMiami Dolphins1,853
2001Priest HolmesKansas City Chiefs1,555
2000Edgerrin JamesIndianapolis Colts1,709

NFL rushing records

NFL running backs have put up some impressive numbers over the years. Below, we outline the three categories where the records have been set.

  • NFL single-game rushing record: Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson set the single-game NFL rushing record on Nov. 4, 2007, when he put up 296 yards (along with three touchdowns) against the San Diego Chargers. Peterson also set the NFL record for most rushing yards in a half with the 253 yards he picked up after halftime.
  • NFL single-season rushing record: Most rushing yards in a season goes to Eric Dickerson, who ran for 2,105 yards in 1984, a mark that’s now stood for decades. We’ll have to see whether the NFL going to 17 games in a season gives future challengers a better shot at setting a new mark.
  • NFL career rushing record: Emmitt Smith, who spent the bulk of his career winning Super Bowls with the Dallas Cowboys, sits atop a list of some very talented RBs as the all-time rushing leader. He put up a staggering 18,355 yards during his 15-year (1990-2004) career.

In second place is Walter Payton with 16,726 yards from 1975-87, while Barry Sanders of Detroit Lions fame is fourth with 15,269 (1989-98). As of March 2022, two players in the top five are still active. Frank Gore, who played for the New York Jets in 2021-22, is third on the all-time list with 16,000 yards. Adrian Peterson, who signed with Seattle in 2021, is fifth with 14,918.

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